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Topic: To find out or Not
2014-03-19 15:32:07
Db's Posts: 3
Joined: 2014-03-08
If you could take the blood test now to detect Alzheimers, would you? and what would you do now to prepare and advise your children for your care?

2014-03-19 15:32:07
Sharon Osvald Posts: 120
Joined: 0000-00-00
I've thought about this for a few days...and no, I wouldn't want to know - unless there was a cure. Interesting question. What about you Db's?

2014-03-20 13:21:37
Db's Posts: 3
Joined: 2014-03-08
I would for sure, but its kind of evident, my dad passed last year of Alzheimers and my mom has dementia and in Fairmount. I am constantly prompting my kids to know what I like and I dont like, I want them to know about the disease. I am hoping my sister who is the caregiver will provide them all the notes from what she has learned from taking care of mom. Love this site, great place for ideas and help.

2014-03-20 13:46:04
MissingMom Posts: 11
Joined: 2014-03-09
Yes definately. I would rather know in advance so I, my family & my doctor are prepared & are keeping a close eye on me to be more aware of the signs & follow through accordingly.

If there is a chance that early knowledge can ensure that I get on the right medication at the right stage & can live indepently for a much longer time because of an early diagnosis I am all for it.

After seeing what Mom has been going through it scares me, but I can only hope that if & when I get there, changes will have been made to ensure an easier transition etc.

Our medical profession will have to be very careful here though & I do worry that a positive result could possibly create concerns of people being misdiagnosed & treated incorrectly because of it. There are numerous factors into "forgetfullness" & such a display could cause some panic by the patient & their family because of that result. But again, it goes back to our doctors being properly trained for this & listening to the patient & the family in order to make that proper diagnosis.

It's all about compassion, trust, "early diagnosis" & proper treatment to help ensure a dignified lifestyle.

2014-03-23 16:23:36
Sharon Osvald Posts: 120
Joined: 0000-00-00
Very, VERY interesting comments and discussion. Food for thought for sure.
I think I'd be more interested in knowing if there was a cure. But, at this point, it isn't just that ignorance is bliss - but also, just me forcing myself to live in the moment. I think it would move passed preparing and into worrying and obsessing for me. (just knowing myself) LOL.

2014-03-24 14:31:47
Sharon Osvald Posts: 120
Joined: 0000-00-00
RYLEY: I asked the Executive Director of my local Alzheimer Society to answer this question. Here is her response:

That is an excellent question. Early diagnosis provides a chance for the person with the diagnosis and their family to prepare themselves for the future. This is especially valuable for the person diagnosed who can still contribute and let their wishes be known. Drugs currently available are most effective in the early stages, so postponing a diagnosis means not taking advantage of treatment options. With regard to driving, it means planning ahead what are the options? Does the caregiver need to learn to drive? Will this mean moving to a new location, nearer bus service? Does a local taxi service offer bulk deals?
Denial is a powerful coping strategy for the present moment, but it creates lots of issues later on. Then the person with the diagnosis may be unable to understand the changes happening around him/her, with resulting anxieties and frustrations. Every family who has embraced the reality of an early diagnosis finds themselves more prepared for the changes that are coming with knowledge of the disease, they are much more capable of adjusting to each change. With knowledge of supports available, they can bring help as it is needed.
A person with an early diagnosis can be a powerful advocate for others living with dementia to show that life does not end with a diagnosis and that there are lots of opportunities to still contribute to society. They can do more to reduce stigma than all the media ads can ever do.
Perhaps the most compelling reason for early diagnosis is that a persons memory loss may not be Alzheimers diseaseit could be a thyroid problem, vitamin deficiency, stress, depressionall things that can be treated. Better to have something fixed than to continue living in a fog because of the stigma of dementia.


Laura Hare
Exec Dir Alzheimer Society Belleville-Hastings-Quinte


2014-04-21 11:53:37
Db's Posts: 9
Joined: 2014-03-23
So how does one find out where they can go to be tested in Canada, is there a link?

2014-04-24 16:46:25
Sharon Osvald Posts: 120
Joined: 0000-00-00
Db's you mentioned a few things you would do if you knew - but I am curious, how would it change your life if you knew? What would you do differently?

2014-04-25 14:06:09
Db's Posts: 9
Joined: 2014-03-23
I have been thinking about your question for a while and I could use the family's sense of humour to reply ie like make sure that mexican villa is ready for me and the beer is chilled , but I am pretty sure I would not change a thing because its a pretty sure bet at this time, I will continue to laugh more at myself when I forget things and chalk it up to the genetics that were presented to me, its a great excuse. I know I would continue to donate to wonderful people like at the KDHS and hope that when the day comes people like them take care of me. So making sure your family knows your wishes is so important. My daughter who wants to find the cure is feeling a little pressured right now....:)

2014-05-06 18:53:29
Sharon Osvald Posts: 120
Joined: 0000-00-00
Good point about making your wishes known ahead of time - as much as we can. Information might not change our outcomes (until that cure arrives) but it gives us some power. Today I was talking a man with Alzheimer's who has an amazing sense of humour. I asked him how he was doing and he laughed and replied: "I don't remember! I get to use that excuse for everything." I had to think...if I ever end up with this disease I hope I am like that!

2014-05-08 16:21:56
Db's Posts: 9
Joined: 2014-03-23
http://www.alzheimercalgary.ca/news/2014/6/10/blood-tests-predicting-alzheimers-disease

Interesting

2014-06-10 22:51:39